Glansevern gardens – a place to unwind

Glansevern-lake2

On a warm day at the end of May, Glansevern Gardens offered up a real opportunity to unwind and take in the soothing surroundings.

Statue in the walled garden

Statue in the walled garden

On one hand, it felt stately and demure as we wandered through the elegant Georgian courtyard into the original walled garden. The planting seemed perfect, with white irises adorning a tranquil white-themed bed, and other beds displaying subdued blues and purples. On the other hand, the informality of many areas and the quirkiness of others maintained our anticipation as we explored.

The Victorian grotto lured us into its dark cave. Fortunately, we were equipped with torches on our mobile phones, or we might have turned back. It didn’t look extensive from the front, but it led us up over the top to another world hosting shrubs ideally suited to the relatively arid rocks. The wide open spaces of Glansevern meant that we had time to think and reflect as we headed for the next intriguing spot indicated by the map. It was a perfect time to see the ‘Wedding Cake’ viburnum, which seemed to draw everyone’s eye

Entrance to Victorian grotto

Entrance to Victorian grotto

Flowers of 'Wedding cake' viburnum

Flowers of ‘Wedding cake’ viburnum

We were able to stroll through the wildflower meadow to the bird hide on the River Severn. It was the smartest bird hide I had ever seen, furnished with tables and chairs more suited to a garden party on the lawn. We remained there for an unexpectedly long time as chains of black-headed gulls entertained us with a mesmerising aerial display, rhythmically swooping and skimming the water.

 

Black-headed gull swooping

Black-headed gull swooping

Lime Hawk-moth

Lime Hawk-moth

By the five acre lake, we were also delighted to get close to a family of Canada geese, the parents carefully shielding their youngsters. It was good to see so many trees with easily accessible name labels, which rewarded us in our efforts to work out what they were. It seemed a good day for spotting wildlife. In one of the many seating shelters, we were lucky to photograph a Lime hawk-moth, which appeared to be sporting its purplish colours indicating it was about to pupate.

The Iron footbridge

The Iron footbridge

We loved the cascading water garden by the lake, with its Candelabra Primulas and impressive Hostas. This was a particularly fun part of the garden to explore, as it was on a small-but-interesting scale. To reach it, we walked over a gorgeous (and quite steep) iron footbridge graced with a glorious shocking pink rhododendron as well as a much more subtle wisteria. The lake maintained its presence as we made our way around it, offering exquisite views across the water.

View of the lake

View of the lake

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